EXPLANATION OF SYMBOLS FOR MAP   

GOLD STAR Voting rights RESTORED after prison, parole or probation (20 States)  

RED FLASH Voting rights may be PERMANENTLY lost (10 States)  

   

YELLOW LIGHTING BOLT Voting rights RESTORED after prison and parole (3 States)  

GREEN SHAMROCK Voting rights UNRESTRICTED, can vote from prison. (2 States)  

YELLOW/ORANGE SUN Voting rights RESTORED after prison. (15 States & DC)  

   

   

   

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Alabama Some people convicted of a felony may apply to have their vote restored immediately upon completion of their full sentence. Those convicted of certain felony offenses such as murder, rape, incest, sexual crime against children, and treason are not eligible for re-enfranchisement. *Source below (1)* Instructions for Voting Restoration, State of Alabama (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  Alaska Automatic voting restoration upon completion of sentence and payment of all fines for first-time, single-felony offenders. Second-time felony offenders may apply for restoration with their county after completion of their sentence.   

Instructions for Voting Restoration, State of Arizona (accessed Oct. 25, 2018) *Source below (1)*  

   

Arizona On Sep. 28, 2016, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed AB 2466, a bill that allows convicted felons who are serving time in county jails (rather than state prison) the ability to vote from within jail. *Source below (1)*  

Assembly Bill No. 2466 (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

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Arkansas Allows convicted felons the unique opportunity to have their voting rights restored under certain conditions.  The felon must provide proof to the county clerk that he or she (1) has been discharged from probation or parole, (2) has paid all probation or parole fees, (3) satisfied all terms of imprisonment, and (4) paid all applicable court costs, fines, or restitution (Ark. Code Ann. Amend. 51 §11(d)(2)(A-D)).   Steps to Restoring Your Voting Rights:   1. Obtain proof from the appropriate state or local agencies that all of the above-mentioned requirements have been completed or proof that your record has been expunged as described on the next page.   2. Submit said proof to the Voter Registration Department of the county clerk’s office where the convicted felon now resides.  3. Complete an Arkansas Voter Registration Application and return it to the Voter Registration Department of the county clerk’s office. *Source below (3)*California On Sep. 28, 2016, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed AB 2466, a bill that allows convicted felons who are serving time in county jails (rather than state prison) the ability to vote from within jail. *Source below (1)* Assembly Bill No. 2466 (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

 
 

Colorado Is one of five states that allow convicted felons to vote once they have completed their prison sentence, including parole requirements. You are eligible to register and vote the day you are released from parole. If you have been convicted of a felony in another state, you must first establish residency in Colorado before you are eligible to vote.  

It doesn’t matter if you were convicted in a state or federal court. Once you are eligible to vote in Colorado, you are eligible to vote in state and federal elections. However, if your name still appears on the state database as an incarcerated person, a voting official can ask for proof that you have completed parole (i.e., your parole discharge documentation).  

If you are in jail serving a misdemeanor sentence, awaiting trial, out on bond, or on probation for a misdemeanor or felony, you have the right to register and vote in any election. But as of July 2006, it is a class five felony charge to register to vote or vote in an election for which you are not legally eligible. *Source below (2)*  

 Connecticut  Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated and on parole. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of parole, and people on probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

 Delaware  On Apr. 16, 2013 the Delaware Senate passed the Hazel D. Plant Voter Restoration Act in a 15-6 vote. The act amended the Delaware Constitution by removing the five year waiting period for most felons to regain the ability to vote. People convicted of a felony (with some exceptions) are now automatically eligible to vote after serving their full sentence including incarceration, parole, and probation.  Exceptions: People convicted of murder or manslaughter, a felony offense against public administration involving bribery, improper influence, or abuse of office, or a felony sexual offense remain permanently disqualified from voting. *Source below (1)* Hazel D. Plant Voter Restoration Act (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  Delaware Constitution: Article V Section 2 (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

 Florida On Mar. 9, 2011 the Florida rules of Executive Clemency were toughened. Automatic restoration of civil rights and the ability to vote will no longer be granted for any offenses. All individuals convicted of any felony will now have to apply for executive clemency after a five year waiting period. Individuals who are convicted, or who have previously been convicted, of certain felonies such as murder, assault, child abuse, drug trafficking, arson, etc. are subject to a seven year waiting period and a clemency board hearing to determine whether or not the ability to vote will be restored. Prior to the Mar. 9, 2011 rule change, some individuals convicted of nonviolent felonies were re-enfranchised automatically by the Clemency Board upon completion of their full sentences, including payment of fines and fees. *Source below (1)* Florida Rules of Executive Clemency (accessed Oct. 25, 2018) Florida Clemency Application (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)    

 Georgia Once a person has completed all of the terms of their sentence, the State of Georgia will automatically restore the individual's voting rights. Every felon needs to register to vote with the Secretary of State’s office. The ACLU of Georgia offers assistance with restoring your voting rights contact them at The ACLU Voting Rights Project: 877-523-2792 or via email at VRPACLU@AOL.COM   

   

Hawaii Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

 
 

Idaho Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

 Illinois Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

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Indiana Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

 Iowa On Jan. 14, 2011, the Republican Governor of Iowa, Terry Branstad, issued executive order 70, rescinding a law allowing people convicted of a felony to automatically have their ability to vote restored after completing their sentences. The automatic voting restoration law had been instituted by former Democratic Governor Tom Vilsack's signing of executive order 42 in 2005. Felons in Iowa must now pay all outstanding monetary obligations to the court in addition to completing their sentence and period of parole or probation. People convicted of a felony may then apply for restoration of the ability to vote. *Source below (1)* Executive Order 70 - Signed Jan. 14, 2011, Terry Branstad, Governor (R)  Executive Order 42 - Signed July 4, 2005, Thomas J. Vilsack, JD, Governor (D) Iowa Streamlined Application for Resotration of Citizenship Rights (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

 Kansas Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  Kentucky  On Nov. 24, 2015, Kentucky Gov. Steven L. Beshear issued executive order 2015-871 to automatically restore the right to vote to nonviolent felons who have completed probation, parole, and who have no outstanding court-ordered restitution payments. On Dec. 22, 2015, newly elected Gov. Matthew G. Bevin issued executive order 2015-052, rescinding the previous Governor’s executive order. As a result, people convicted of any felony in Kentucky must individually apply with the Governor to have their voting rights restored. *Source below (1)* Executive Order 2015-052 - Signed Dec. 22, 2015, Matthew G. Bevin, Governor (R) Executive Order 2015-871 - Signed Nov. 24, 2015, Steven L. Beshear, Governor (D)  

Kentucky Application for Restoration of Civil Rights (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

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Louisiana Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

   

Maine The right to vote is never taken away from individuals convicted of felony, even while incarcerated. *Source below (4)*  

   

Maryland On Feb. 9, 2016, the Maryland General Assembly overrode the Governor's veto of SB 340 and restored the vote to all convicted felons immediately upon their release from prison. Previously, convicted felons in Maryland had to complete all parole and probation before they were able to vote. *Source below (1)*  

Senate Bill 340 (accessed Oct. 25, 2018 )  

   

Massachusetts Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

   

Michigan   

Visit the Michigan Department of State’s website for more information.   

*Source below (4)*  

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Minnesota Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

 Mississippi People convicted of a felony are barred from voting only if they have been convicted of one or more of the following specific felony crimes: "murder, rape, bribery, theft, arson, obtaining money or goods under false pretense, perjury, forgery, embezzlement, bigamy, armed robbery, extortion, felony bad check, felony shoplifting, larceny, receiving stolen property, robbery, timber larceny, unlawful taking of a motor vehicle, statutory rape, carjacking, or larceny under lease or rental agreement."  To regain the ability to vote, an individual, after completion of his/her sentence, must go to his/her state representative and convince them to personally author a bill restoring the vote to that individual. Both houses of the legislature must then pass the bill. Re-enfranchisement can also be granted directly by the governor.  Individuals convicted of felonies in Mississippi remain eligible to vote for US President in federal elections. *Source below (1)* Mississippi Constitution: Article 12, Section 241 (accessed Oct. 25, 2018 ) Mississippi Constitution: Article 12, Section 253 (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

 Missouri  Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. Individuals who have been convicted of an election offense, whether a felony or misdemeanor, are not allowed to vote. *Source below (4)*  

 Montana Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

   

Nebraska People convicted of a felony are automatically permitted to vote two years after completion of their sentence of incarceration and all parole and probation for all convictions except treason. *Source below (1)* Felon Voting Rights FAQ (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

 Nevada The vote is automatically restored to all people convicted of a nonviolent felony after the sentence completion. People convicted of a violent felony and all second- time felony offenders (whether violent or nonviolent) are not automatically re-enfranchised. Those individuals must seek restoration of their voting abilities in the court in which they were convicted. *Source below (1)* Nevada Code: Section NRS 213.09 (accessed Oct. 25, 2018 )    

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New Hampshire Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*   

   

New Jersey Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote.*Source below (4)*  

   

New Mexico Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

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New York On Apr. 18, 2018, New York Governor Andrew Cuomo issued Executive Order 181 to restore the right to vote to parolees, dependent upon review of records by the Governor's Office. The Commissioner of the Department of Corrections and Community Supervision will submit records for individuals released from prison in the prior month beginning on May 1, 2018 for review. Previously, voting was allowed only after completion of parole. *Source below (1)* Executive Order No. 181, Signed Apr. 18, 2018, Andrew M. Cuomo, JD, Governor (D)   

North Carolina Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

   

North Dakota Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

   

Ohio Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*   

Oklahoma Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are eventually automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release, but only after a period of time equal to the length of sentence passed. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote at that time. *Source below (4)*  

   

Oregon Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

 Pennsylvania Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

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Rhode Island Rhode Island Constitution provides that “No person who is incarcerated in a correctional facility upon a felony conviction shall be permitted to vote until such person is discharged from the facility. Upon discharge, such person’s right to vote shall be restored.”  R.I. Const. art. II1  The department of corrections acts as a voter registration agency with certain duties as part of the release from prison. See R.I. Gen. Laws § 17-9.2-3. *Source below (5)*  

 South Carolina Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote.*Source below (4)*  

 South Dakota On Mar. 19, 2012, HB 1247 was enacted. The bill took the ability to vote away from convicted felons serving terms of probation. Previously, only people on parole or incarcerated were ineligible to register to vote. Now convicted felons must ser*e their full term of incarceration, parole, and probation before they may register to vote.  *Source below (1) South Dakota: HB 1247 (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

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Tennessee All people convicted of a felony since 1981, except for some serious felonies such as murder, rape, treason and voter fraud, may apply to the Board of Probation and Parole for voting restoration upon completion of their sentence. People convicted of a felony between Jan. 15, 1973, and May 17, 1981, are eligible to register to vote regardless of the crime committed. People convicted of certain felonies prior to Jan. 15, 1973 may be barred from voting. *Source below (1)* Tennessee Restoration of Voting Rights (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)   

Texas Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights are automatically restored upon completion of all supervised release. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

   

Utah Individuals incarcerated for a felony conviction are ineligible to vote. Voting rights are automatically restored upon release from prison, and people on parole or probation can vote. Ex-offenders should re-register to vote. *Source below (4)*  

   

Vermont The right to vote is never taken away from individuals convicted of a felony, even while incarcerated. *Source below (4)*  

   

Virginia On Apr. 18, 2014 Governor Terry McAuliffe announced changes to Virginia's restoration of rights process. Under the new rules, people convicted of non-violent felonies (including drug crimes) will have their ability to vote automatically restored providing that they:1. have completed their term of incarceration and all probation or parole;   

2. have paid all court costs, fines, and any restitution; and 3. have no pending felony charges.  On June 23, 2015 Governor McAuliffe announced that "outstanding court costs and fees will no longer prohibit an individual from having his or her rights restored."  On Apr. 22, 2016, Governor McAuliffe signed an order restoring the vote to all 200,000+ felons in Virginia, regardless of their charge, who had completed their term of incarceration and their term of probation or parole. The New York Times reports (Apr. 22, 2016, "Virginia Governor Restores Voting Rights to Felons") that the governor's action will not apply to felons released in the future, although the Governor's aides say he plans "to issue similar orders on a monthly basis to cover people as they are released."  On July 22, 2016 the Virginia Supreme Court overturned Gov. Terry McAuliffe's blanket restoration of voting rights for over 200,000 convicted felons. In a press release the Governor stated that he "will expeditiously sign nearly 13,000 individual orders to restore the fundamental rights of the citizens who have had their rights restored and registered to vote. And I will continue to sign orders until I have completed restoration for all 200,000 Virginians."  According to an email from the Virginia Department of Elections that was provided to ProCon.org on Mar. 28, 2018, "Virginia applies the restoration policy of the state the conviction was handed down." So, for instance, if a person was convicted in an automatic restoration state such as California, and then moved to Virginia, that individual would be eligible to register to vote in Virginia.  More information about restoration of voting rights in Virginia is available at: restore.virginia.gov *Source below (1)*  Governor McAuliffe's Statement on the Virginia Supreme Court Decision (accessed Oct. 25, 2018) Governor McAuliffe Restores Voting and Civil Rights to Over 200,000 Virginians (accessed Oct. 25, 2018) Governor McAuliffe Announces New Reforms to Restoration of Rights Process (accessed Oct. 25, 2018) Governor McAuliffe’s Letter Outlining His Policy Changes (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

   

Washington All people with a felony conviction must re-register to vote after completion of their sentence and all parole and probation. However, the Secretary of State's website states that "your voting rights can be revoked if the sentencing court determines that you have failed to comply with the terms of your legal financial obligations." *Source below (1)*  

Felons and Voting Rights (accessed Oct. 25, 2018)  

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West Virginia Voting rights are restored to a convicted felon upon completion of his or her sentence. Sentence includes prison time, parole and probation. *Source below (6)*  

   

Wisconsin Under Wisconsin laws, a convicted felon may not vote until such time that the sentence imposed for the felony has been completed provided no other voting restrictions or felony convictions exist. *Source below (7)  

 Wyoming Individuals convicted of a felony are ineligible to vote while incarcerated, on parole, or on probation. Voting rights restoration is dependent on the type of conviction: first-time non-violent felony offenders can apply to the Wyoming Board of Parole five years after completion of sentence. All others must apply to the Governor for either a pardon or a restoration of rights, but must wait ten and five years, respectively, after completing their sentence.  

  *Source below (4)*  

   

Additional sources for this information:   

   

(1) ProCon.org  https://felonvoting.procon.org/view.resource.php?resourceID=000286&fbclid=IwAR2bSjsnUCb01_ZPl-TBEjU4vCo4x7sVcuBtE1HzxOeYwm1wislOsdzpRIQ   

   

(2) Legal Beagle https://legalbeagle.com/6686608-rights-convicted-felons-colorado.html  

   

(3) https://static.ark.org/eeuploads/pulaski/Felon_Restoration_of_Voting_Rights_Brochure.pdf  

   

(4) Non-Profit VOTE https://www.nonprofitvote.org/voting-in-your-state/special-circumstances/voting-as-an-ex-offender/  

 
(5) Restoration of Rights Project http://ccresourcecenter.org/state-restoration-profiles/rhode-island-restoration-of-rights-pardon-expungement-sealing/  

  (6) BallotPedia  https://ballotpedia.org/Voting_in_West_Virginia  

  (7) Wisconsin Expungement http://www.wisconsinexpungement.com/Felony.html 

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